Civic Holiday Long Weekend Activities

Wondering what to do for the Civic Holiday long weekend? It’s one of the last long weekends of summer (sorry to bring that up!), so grab the family and use Viamede Resort as your home base for a Kawarthas weekend adventure. Here are a few ideas of things going on this upcoming weekend.

Bobcaygeon Midnight Madness

When: Saturday, August 3 | 7 to 11:59 PM
Where: Downtown Bobcaygeon

This annual street festival features sidewalk sales, live music and entertainment, inflatables, games, and more.

Simcoe Day Weekend

When: Friday, August 2 – Sunday, August 4, 2019 | 10 AM to 5 PM
Where: Downtown Fenelon Falls

There will be historical re-enactments, lumberjack demonstrations, music, arts, and more!

Stoney Lake Shed Market

When: Saturday, August 3, 2019 | 9 AM to 1 PM
Where: Carveth’s Marina, Selwyn

Browse second-hand treasures with proceeds shared between Five Counties and Quilts for Cancer.

Long Weekends at Viamede

We have to plug our own fun recreation schedule which includes pool volleyball, wine tastings, Kids’ Club (so parents can enjoy some time off!), and evening bonfires with s’mores.

Voyageur Canoe Tour

When: Monday, August 5, 2019 | 10:30 AM to 12 PM
Where: Peterborough Lift Lock (353 Hunter Street, Peterborough)

Hop aboard a voyageur canoe and traverse part of the Trent-Severn waterway, including passing through the Peterborough Lift Lock.

 


From the Mount Julian Kitchen

by Mandy Weaver, Culinary Chef

And so, with the sunshine and the great bursts of leaves growing on the trees, I had that familiar conviction that life was beginning over again with the summer.

– F. Scott Fitzgerald

Spring and summer seem to have blended into one and descended upon us in a rush and I, for one, am happy to welcome it in.

Greetings from the Mount Julian kitchen. I feel that it is high time I introduce myself. My name is Mandy and I will be cooking for you today. Taking the freshest ingredients I can either forage myself, gather from the garden (with Bob’s blessing, of course!), or source from local providers. Preparing and assembling said ingredients into a coherent dish for your sensory pleasure.

In my first couple weeks at Viamede, there were some adjustments made into my new surroundings: new relationships built, new foraging locations sought out, and new menu ideas blooming into existence. The North Kawartha area has proven to be a fascinating location, flush with much familiar vegetation as well as a few ‘new to me’ items ripe for the avid forager to discover. I always keep in mind the sustainability of the item foraged. Thus far in my short time at Viamede Resort, we have collected, frozen, pickled, preserved, dehydrated and utilised spruce tips, ramps (also known as wild leeks), lilac flowers, chive (so much chive), daylilies, as well as many other wild flowers. Now, berry season has started!

Bob the Gardener and I go for regular tours of the gardens to see what is usable now, and what I can start planning to use in the coming weeks. He’s grown oodles of lettuce varieties and herbs galore. The carrots, beets, and radishes are just at the baby stage, which pair perfectly with fish or make an enticing amuse bouche, and, don’t tell him, but I’ve even started getting into his peas.

I still have much to discover in the field of local farmers (mind the pun), however, Buckhorn Berry Farm has had a phenomenal strawberry season. Fingers crossed I make it out one more time before the berries are all gone.

Having been born and raised in Norfolk County on the shores of Lake Erie, farming, foraging, preserving and freezing has always been a big part of my life. To now be in a position that, though far from home, brings me back to my roots, I feel quite blessed. I am grateful to my parents for providing me with a solid foundation in sustainably harvesting from the land, as well as the Viamede Team for inviting me in and providing me this opportunity to expand my knowledge, while also pursuing my career and living my dream all at the same time.

Signing off for now,

Mandy

 

Enjoy a 5, 7, or 9 course tasting menu at Mount Julian restaurant – call or email to reserve your table!


Why a Weekend Away is Good for Your Health

by Laura Belus, ND – Elevate Wellness Retreats

With the speed at which our society moves these days, a weekend away can be hard to come by, but could it be worth it in more ways than one? Getting out of your normal routine, unplugging, and reconnecting with your loved ones can have a profound impact on your health!

In our current culture, a weekend away may seem like an indulgence, but if you’re someone who has a stressful day-to-day life (who doesn’t?), it might be essential.

When you’re stressed, you release the hormone cortisol. Cortisol puts you into the “fight or flight” mode, which sounds primitive – because it is. Our bodies are triggered to release cortisol when the brain interprets “stress”. When evolution constructed this pathway, “stress” was something that put you in immediate danger – such as a bear chasing you. Today, “stress” can be anything from a big meeting, a traffic jam, or running late for work. These events aren’t as serious as a bear chasing you, but your body perceives it the same way and responds by releasing an array of hormones, including cortisol.

Cortisol suppresses digestion, immunity, and reproductive hormones (non-essentials during a stressful moment), and enhances cognitive function and muscular activity. This is why chronic stress can cause digestive problems, frequent infections, and hormonal irregularities. If you are under stress for a prolonged time, your cortisol levels can be consistently high, which can lead to elevated blood sugar, and fat accumulation around the midsection. It can also lead to exhaustion of your adrenal glands (which are responsible for making the cortisol), leading to a range of symptoms such as moodiness, fatigue, anxiety, depression, and high blood pressure. Reducing your stress is critical to lowering your cortisol levels and maintaining optimal health. Here’s where a weekend away can help you deal with your daily stressors!

Not only is a weekend away relaxing, taking a break from daily stressors can have a profound positive impact on your cortisol levels, improving your mental and physical health. Getting out of your daily routine can provide you with a fresh perspective and give you clarity on any decisions you may be facing. A change of scenery, especially when that scenery is nature, is a great investment in self-care. It has even been found that spending time in nature by engaging in activities such as gardening can lower cortisol levels and reduce depression symptoms. When you take time to relax, you are actively improving your overall health by changing your stress hormone levels.

Going on vacation with loved ones is also a great opportunity to spend quality time together and allow yourself to refocus on what’s important. Going away with loved ones, such a romantic partner, can also help you and your partner learn how to support each other as you prioritize your health goals.

Regions of your brain actually undergo physical changes in response to chronic stress which are reversible if the stress lasts weeks, but it’s unclear whether these changes can be reversed if it lasts months or years. Taking a weekend off to destress is starting to sound crucial isn’t it? It’s a great balance to working hard Monday through Friday. You may even find that you return to work with more positive energy than when you left, feeling refreshed and ready to be productive. Go ahead and book a weekend getaway – it’s not an indulgence if it’s good for your health!

If you’re looking for a weekend getaway that includes your partner, why not join Elevate Wellness Retreats this September 27-29, 2019 at Viamede Resort to learn how to boost the health of yourself and your relationship. Learn more by visiting www.elevatewellnessretreat.com.

References

  1. Detweiler, M.B, Self, J. A., Lane, S., Spencer, L., Lutgens, B., Kim, D. Y., . . . Lehmann, L. P. (2015). Horticultural therapy: a pilot study on modulating cortisol levels and indices of substance craving, posttraumatic stress disorder, depression, and quality of life in veterans.
  2. McEwen, B. S. (2008). Central effects of stress hormones in health and disease: understanding the protective and damaging effects of stress and stress mediators. European Journal of Pharmacology, 583(2-3): 174-185.