Garlic Mustard Chimichurri Recipe

by Kyle Wagenblast, Executive Chef

Foraging is in full swing and while everyone is talking and raving about Wild Leeks (yes, they are amazing), we are diligently working on doing our part on another tasty, but invasive green: Garlic Mustard!

Garlic Mustard is an herb that was brought over by Europeans in the 1800s. It is high in Vitamin A and C, and it is very tasty. The leafs are tender and slightly bitter with tastes of mustard greens and garlic, while the flowers have a spicy horseradish flavour.

That being said, go out and do your part to combat this invasive herb! Pick as much as you can find and make yourself something delicious; Garlic Mustard Pesto is a crowd favourite, but seeing as BBQ season is upon us, let’s switch it up a little.

Chimichurri! The grass routes of this sauce are Argentinian and typically accompanies most cuts of beef. It can even be used as a marinade.

Garlic Mustard Chimichurri

Garlic Mustard Chimichurri Recipe

Ingredients
  • 2 cups Garlic Mustard leaves and flower buds, tightly packed
  • ½ cup diced red onion
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 2 tbsp fresh lemon or lime juice
  • 2 tbsp red wine vinegar
  • ½ tsp Kosher salt
  • ¼ tsp fresh ground black pepper
  • ¼ tsp red pepper flakes (or more, to taste)
  • ½ cup good quality oil
Steps
  1. Add all ingredients except oil to food processor and pulse until just chopped.
  2. Slowly add oil and continue to pulse until all oil is incorporated.
  3. Scrape down sides of the bowl and pulse a few more times.
  4. You’re ready to go; enjoy! This makes an excellent sauce or marinade for beef.

Dandelion Marmalade Recipe

by Kyle Wagenblast, Executive Chef

It’s that time of year again where, whether you love them or hate them, the dandelions are out in full force. When they start lining up for Mount Julian, we start lining up our pots!

 

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Dandelions are one of the first plants to really green up in the spring. They are also one of a few plants that are entirely edible from the flower down to the root. Typically we pluck the leaves and, yes, we have all had dandelion in salad. Boring!

So, what else can we do with this plant? The roots are often dried and used to make a coffee or herbal tea. The leaves, when young, are tender and great for salad, but another idea is to add them to a soup.

And last, but certainly not least, the flower! Vibrant yellow in colour, full of nectar, and essential for our bees. The flower is also the most fun to play with because there is so much you can do. You can fry them in butter, make fritters with them, dandelion wine is a popular choice, or you can even make beer. Today, we are going to make some Dandelion Marmalade!

Dandelion Marmalade recipe; foraging dandelions

Dandelion Marmalade Recipe

Ingredients

4 cups water
4 cups dandelion flowers, yellow and white part only (I picked 7 cups roughly to achieve this)
¼ cup plus 1 ½ teaspoons of pectin (about half a pouch)
4 ½ cups granulated sugar
2 tbsp lemon juice

Steps
  1. Bring water and dandelions to a boil, reduce heat and simmer for 3 minutes. Remove from heat and let sit for 10 minutes.
  2. Strain liquid through a fine mesh strainer; you should get 3 cups – if not, add a little water.
  3. Combine pectin and ½ cup of sugar in a small mixing bowl and set aside.
  4. Bring dandelion water and remaining ingredients to a boil. Slowly add pectin mixture, stirring constantly and boil for 1 minute.
  5. Skim any foam that may have formed and store in air tight containers.
  6. Refrigerate till set, about 4 hours.
  7. Enjoy!

Note: The shelf life on this should be at least 2 weeks if heat sealed even longer.

 

Our restaurants serve food made with fresh, foraged, and locally farmed ingredients, all part of our Whole Hog food philosophy.


Cooking with Kids

by Chef Kyle Wagenblast

Cooking with children can be challenging, but rewarding in so many ways. It’s a great way to spend time together with your kids and give them a chance to learn and obtain hands-on experiences.

In baking we use a dash of science, a pinch of math, a cup of patience, a tablespoon of confidence, and lbs of accomplishment. We use science by getting the yeast to bloom and start eating sugars; this creates gasses that help our bread to rise. We use math to determine ratios of how much liquid to dry ingredients we need, and to adapt our ingredients if we decide to double or half our recipe. Patience is needed to give the dough proper time to proof and rise. We use confidence as we read through all our steps and know it will turn out, as well as afterwards in knowing that we can change subtle things and still have it work out. The more you do the more confident you become. As for accomplishment, well, who doesn’t like a fresh loaf of bread!

Don’t forget there are also many quick breads that can be made such as banana bread, pancakes, or muffins. These are great fun to make, and can be a better choice for younger kids with shorter attention spans since there is no proofing time required. Just a quick mix and you’re ready to go!

East Coast White Bread

Photo of freshly basked loaf of bread cooling on a wire rack.

This is a Recipe adapted from a friend on the east coast for a traditional white bread. These instructions will walk you through making the bread by hand.

Ingredients
  • 5 cups or 635 grams all purpose flour
  • 1 package or 7 grams traditional active dry yeast (not instant yeast)
  • 2 teaspoons or 10 grams of fine salt, good quality
  • 3 tablespoons or 45 grams sugar
  • 3 tablespoons or 55 grams butter, melted (need only 45 grams, use the rest to grease proofing bowl)
  • 2 cups or 290 grams milk, lukewarm
Instructions
  1. Dissolve 1 tablespoon of sugar into 1/2 cup lukewarm water; sprinkle yeast over surface of water. Let stand for about 15 minutes until yeast foams well, then stir to combine.
  2. Combine 3 cups of flour, 2 tablespoons sugar and salt into large bowl. Add prepared yeast, melted butter and warm milk. Using a wooden spoon, mix for 4 to 5 minutes until mixture is smooth.
  3. Slowly incorporate remaining 2 cups flour, mixing gradually until soft dough forms and leaves sides of bowl. You may need to use a little more or a little less flour; add only enough flour to form a dough that releases from sides of bowl and remains slightly tacky, but can be handled with your bare hands.
  4. Turn the dough out onto work-surface to knead; knead for 8 minutes, then form into a ball and place in a large greased bowl.
  5. Cover dough and proof in a warm place for one hour until the dough doubles in size.
  6. Punch dough down and knead a few minutes by hand before resting for another 10 minutes.
  7. Grease 2 medium loaf pans; divide dough into 4-6 equal portions. Form each division into a ball, placing 2 or 3 balls of dough in each loaf pan.
  8. Cover with clean tea towel; proof until about 2 inches above rim of loaf pan (approximately 2 hours, depending upon room temperature).
  9. Bake at 350 F for 30-40 minutes depending on size of pans, or until loaves are golden and sound hollow when tapped.
  10. Turn loaves onto wire rack to cool; brush tops with melted butter to soften top crust.

Chef Kyle will be leading bread making classes as part of our March Break activity schedule.