Viamede Holiday Traditions

The Holidays are here, and with that comes fun (and maybe a bit quirky) family traditions! These special memories can be anything from hanging the outside Christmas lights, visiting a local Christmas Tree farm to cut down the perfect tree, or even baking gingerbread in matching pajamas belting out the classic carol, Grandma got ran over by a Reindeer. 

Much like your family, the Viamede family has their favourite traditions that we want to invite you to participate in. While you may not get the (dis)pleasure of hearing us sing carols, here are some of our Holiday traditions: 

Viamede Yetis 

These funny guys like to hide around the property. Bundle up warm and start the mission of finding them throughout the property in the winter months. Don’t be fooled – sometimes they make it easy on you, but we have a few mischievous Yetis that are pros at this game. Can you and your family find 3 out of the 7 Viamede Yetis to win the prize? Don’t worry – no matter the outcome, we’ll reward you with a delicious cup of hot chocolate to warm you up from the cold. 

Cooking Decorating 

Let’s be honest, Santa isn’t the only one that loves to have some milk and cookies during the Holidays. At Viamede we’ve got you covered with our 24/7 sugar cookie station, guaranteed to fulfill all those cookie cravings. Take advantage of the decorating supplies, be as creative as you want, we promise we won’t judge your cookie decorating skills… or how many cookies you eat! 

“The Stockings Were Hung By The Chimney With Care” 

Stockings are so symbolic of the Holiday Season. History has it that children would place 1 of their everyday socks on the fireplace mantel. (don’t worry you can leave your socks in the room, we have you covered!) Personalize a stocking with your name, buttons, and whatever else strikes your fancy. Than just like the good ol’ days, hang it on our fireplace mantel from all the way back in 1885. Be sure to check back Sunday morning. Do you think you made the nice list? 


Preserving Summer

Strawberries being preserved

by Alyssa Joynt

As the lake begins to freeze over and the soft glittering blanket of snow descends over the rooves of the cottages, icing the trees and turning Viamede into a scene out of a mythical Christmas town, it can be hard to remember that just a few short months ago there were people playing on the water trampoline and fresh fruit on the tables. The bright and loud colours of summer can get lost in the wintery quiet, but Viamede has a secret for keeping the flavour of summer alive.

You may have noticed jars on the mantle in 1885 and Mount Julian and passed them off for decoration. All of those jars, however, are preserves, made right here at Viamede to help bring the memories of summer to the table throughout the year. This past July, I got to watch Chef preserve strawberries!

All of the berries come from nearby McLean Berry Farm. It doesn’t get more local then this! Before talking to Chef, I always thought of preserves in the form of jams and jellies. Chef, however, chooses to preserve the berries whole. When asked why, his answer was simple. Whole berries are much more versatile, and “in the dead of winter, when you have these freshly preserved strawberries, it’s just lovely”. As Chef explained, “Strawberries are such an Ontario ingredient… strawberries remind me of Ontario summer more than any other food”, and bringing the delicious flavour of local Ontario berries into a mid-January meal is the perfect way to harken back to the highlights of summer. These strawberry preserves will mostly be used for desserts, because the sugar used as a preservative adds a lot of sweetness, but they can also be used as an accompanying sauce on a cheese plate or in a salad dressing.

So how do the berries get preserved, exactly? The process can take a few days, and involves mixing the berries with sugar to really pull out the flavour, as well as cycles of heating and cooling until the berries are tender and can be strained out of the liquid. The liquid is brought to a hot temperature by itself and any foam is skimmed off, and then the berries are poured into sterilized jars with the hot syrup ladled overtop. The jars are then boiled to seal them and keep out any contamination- if the jars are properly sealed, the preserves can last for a year or more!

Strawberries aren’t the only thing that Chef preserves, though. As he noted, “the more local produce we preserve, the happier we’ll be!”. Viamede’s focus on local ingredients lends well to preserving the landscape around us, so it is always the goal to preserve aspects of each season. Some of the highlights of early summer include garlic, strawberries, raspberries, and cattails, and of course the wild blueberries that are such an iconic ingredient in the Kawarthas. Later summer features tomatoes, peppers, and cucumbers, and the fall harvest focuses in on squash, apples, and potatoes. By preserving aspects of each season, every meal can remain centered around the local theme throughout the year, while also painting a picture of the seasons and the culinary landscape of the Kawarthas.


The Winter Harvest

by Executive Chef Alexander Barron

We’re well into November and the snows are falling hard.  It’s a visual (and thermal) sign of crossing into winter, though on the calendar it’s still autumn, and the kitchens are preparing to cook through the long snowy season.

In order to make it through, this year we are growing our own greens and sprouts in the main dining room with its floor-to-ceiling windows.  We are still learning the best method, but if you stay with us this winter you may see one of the cooks trimming greens for your salad or sprouts for a garnish on your plate.

Foraging is not completely finished either, as there are a few things we can harvest even through the snow cover.  Many of our perennial herbs can simply be uncovered and trimmed, and then covered up again with snow to protect them from the cold air.  We will also be harvesting sumac straight from the trees to play with.  Part of the fun is seeing what is still available.

This time of year much of the Ontario harvest is still good and fresh (kept in proper storage) so we can pickle a good variety of vegetables.  We’re also getting excited about squash, pumpkin, cabbages, roots, apples and pears which keep well.  They’ve gotten something of a bad name as part of a boring winter cuisine, (think boiled vegetables with no flavour! or don’t if you prefer), but we think this is just part of the cook’s ever-changing challenge to keep food interesting and appetizing.  It doesn’t hurt that Ontario now boasts excellent greenhouses as well.

As the earth quiets, and settles for a long winter’s sleep, it’s time for these beautiful ingredients to shine. The whole culinary team at Viamede is looking forward to serving up hearty, nourishing, and imaginative meals. We can’t wait to welcome you!